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This gynecologist wants you to try a telehealth Well-woman visit

This gynecologist wants you to try a telehealth Well-woman visit

At LOLA, our mission is to provide this community with the resources you need to make empowered and informed decisions about your reproductive health. Whether you’re looking for information about natural period products, or expert advice on your irregular period, we’re here for you. 

In that spirit (and in honor of Women’s Health Week) we recently asked our community to share the reproductive health questions that keep you up at night.  We’re featuring those questions, along with answers from our team of medical experts, every day this week on our Instagram channel.  
We kicked off this year’s Women’s Health Week in a conversation with Dr. Wendy Hurst, a gynecologist, member of LOLA’s medical advisory board, and contributor to Ask an Expert, about how to navigate our Well-woman exams after the coronavirus pandemic. Click here to watch the full interview, or check out the conversation highlights below for some great tips.

Q&A with Dr. Wendy Hurst

Community Question:

Why is preventative care important?

Dr. Hurst:

Many women see a primary care physician who does not usually address the relationship between health issues that are particular to women. If we can intervene and help women to maintain a healthy lifestyle, by looking at their medical history, looking at specific issues related to women — including their periods, which are markers of health in general — we can help women stay as healthy as possible.

Community Question:

Do I need a Well-woman exam every year?

Dr. Hurst:

You need a Well-woman appointment, but not necessarily an exam. This is a common misconception. It’s more accurate to call it a Well-woman visit. Sometimes it will just be taking history, pointing out risk factors, and/or counseling on contraception. Some Well-woman visits include an exam and some do not. If we’re following American College of OBGYN guidelines, we’re not doing pap smears more than once every three to five years depending on results from previous paps. If a patient has normal paps, and is negative for HPV, she does not need to have a pap every year.

Community Question:

How has the coronavirus shifted how women receive these exams?

Dr. Hurst:

When COVID-19 came into our lives in March, our office — and most offices — closed while attention was turned toward taking care of COVID patients. But now that COVID has stabilized, we are following hospital guidelines, CDC guidelines, and American College of OBGYN guidelines as we open up our offices with caution. Everyone wears a mask, we take the temperatures of patients at the door, we use the parking lot as a waiting room and call people when the doctor can see them. With these precautions, we’re still making sure women get the exact care that they need. Some women need to come in — or are eager to come in — and with these precautions, that’s okay. For others who have risk factors — or are nervous about coming in — a Well-woman visit via telemedicine can be acceptable for the right patient.

Community question:

What are some tips for navigating telehealth appointments so you get the most out of them?

Dr. Hurst:

The telehealth visit is really the same as the history part of the visit of a wellwoman exam. Again, some women do not need physical examinations. The same questions that someone would bring with her to her yearly checkup, would be brought with her to her telemedicine appointment. And these appointments are scheduled in exactly the same way. Since we often have a little bit more time in a telemedicine visit, patients actually have more time to ask questions. It can be a real positive.

Community Question:

Any advice on improving communication with your provider, whether over a screen, email, or in person?

Community question:

It has to be a two-way street. Hopefully your physician is asking questions to invite this discussion. But it’s also a great practice for you to write down questions in advance to bring to the appointment to make sure you hit those questions. You should also rest assured that if you have a question, many women have the same one. Don’t be afraid to ask.

Community Question:

Speaking of in-person, as states start to open up, do you have advice for practicing safety as people return to their doctor’s office?

Dr. Hurst:

While we are taking every precaution we can take, many women are still feeling nervous about coming in. We are telling those patients to wear a mask and maintain social distancing even on the elevator and stairs. If you assume you might get it, and the person next to you has it, you are taking the right precautions — whether you’re coming to the office or going to the grocery store.

For more advice from Dr. Hurst, find her on The Spot and on Instagram @the.gy.know

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