shop Lola

The summer of sex is here. Are you ready?

The summer of sex is here. Are you ready?

Throughout history, there have been times when sustained and collective hardship were followed by transformation. The original Roaring Twenties, for example, was a stretch of unprecedented prosperity in America that followed a devastating war, pandemic and depression. This summer, as COVID-19 restrictions continue to lift across the country, is shaping up to be one of those moments in the United States. 

Call it what you will — the new Summer of Love, the Roaring 2020s, Hot Vax Summer — Americans are physically reconnecting. After over a year of isolation, many people are ready to make the most of this summer, filling the warmer months with long-awaited reunions, new relationships and of course, sex.

No matter your sexual situation as we officially kick off summer, a bit of preparation is a good idea. After all, the pandemic’s been a long, draining experience, that’s changed our lives and challenged us in ways we weren’t expecting. Taking the time to plan ahead can ensure you’re ready to fully enjoy sex post-lockdown, while still playing it safe.

Preparing for a summer of sex

Single and ready to mingle? In a long-term relationship but feeling the urge to explore? Interested in taking solo sex in a new direction? Your sexuality is as unique as you are, but here are some tips that can help you physically, emotionally and mentally prep for the next season of your sex life.

Reconnect with your body first

Pandemic behaviors have wreaked havoc on our bodies. The lack of movement and increased hours at make-shift desks for those working remote, and the constant stress for everyone have added up to weight gain, new aches, and diminished flexibility and mobility for many. Not to mention the long term effects some people are experiencing from the coronavirus, which includes everything from hair loss1 to joint and muscle pain.2 

While we’re thankfully able to resume most pre-pandemic activities now, many of us are still dealing with the physical changes the last year caused, and may not be feeling our sexiest. There’s no single solution, but solo sex is a great place to start on the road to reconnecting with our bodies. If it’s been awhile since you last masturbated, keep it simple: light a candle, grab a good vibrator, and check out some ethical porn to get in the mood.

Go at your own pace

Your social feeds may be filled with joyful reunions and social scenes, but in reality, not everyone is ready for in-person interactions. In fact, a poll earlier in the year by the American Psychological Association found that roughly half of surveyed adults were uneasy about resuming in-person interactions after the pandemic’s end.3  We’ve all been through a lot, we’re all re-emerging at our own pace, and that’s perfectly fine. If physical interaction with others, be it a hug or sex, feels like too much right now, then don’t pressure yourself. 

Practice safe sex

If, on the other hand, you’re ready for partnered sex: safety first. If you haven’t had an STD test since your last sexual partner, be sure to do so before having sex with someone new. And don’t consider it a one-and-done: regular STD testing is an important part of your sexual health. Establishing open communication with your healthcare provider about your sexual history, proactively requesting testing during your annual checkup, and getting tested before having sex with a new partner are all great steps to protect yourself and others. It’s also never been easier: thanks to at-home STD tests, you can now screen for specific sexually transmitted infections (STIs) from the comfort of your own bathroom.

Condoms are another smart choice for safe sex. If properly used every time you have sex, male condoms are 98% effective at preventing pregnancy.5 Latex condoms also reduce the risk of transmitting STIs that are passed via bodily fluids, from chlamydia to HIV. We recommend always keeping some handy — in your nightstand, your purse or pocket — so you’re ready whenever an opportunity arises.

Don’t be afraid to experiment

Alright, let’s talk about your sexual fantasies. What have you always wanted to do in bed, but haven’t yet? This summer could be the perfect time to try new things and explore your sexuality. According to a study designed by the Kinsey Institute, 46% of respondents said they’re engaging in more sexual experimentation thanks to the pandemic.6 Be it BDSM, a threesome, or anal sex, expanding your sexual experiences can teach you more about yourself and what you do and don’t like. (Just be sure to use plenty of lube if anal sex is on your list.)

Consider shopping around for an assist 

If stress sent your libido on sabbatical last year, you’re not alone. A survey of American adults found that nearly half reported a decline in their sex life during the earlier months of the 2020. The good news is that there are all sorts of products that may help, whether you’re looking to rekindle your desire, or simply want to test out some new goodies. 

The options are practically endless when it comes to sex toys, though our guide can help you find the perfect fit. Similarly, there’s a plethora of liquid products to help enhance your experience in the bedroom these days. Lubricants come to mind first, but there are also pleasure gels that can heighten clitoral stimulation, and even arousal oils infused with CBD. Experimentation applies here too, so try a few things, and include any partners in the hunt. They may have some great recommendations you haven’t heard of!

Our biggest tip heading into the summer is this: have fun, do what feels good, and don’t worry if things get a little awkward at times. That’s advice that applies to sex, Summer 2021, and life in general.


References

  1. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/18/style/hair-loss-coronavirus-pandemic.html
  2. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/in-depth/coronavirus-long-term-effects/art-20490351
  3. https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2021/03/one-year-pandemic-stress
  4. https://www.cdc.gov/std/prevention/screeningreccs.htm
  5. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/birth-control/condom/how-effective-are-condoms
  6. https://blogs.iu.edu/kinseyinstitute/2021/04/21/new-study-on-post-pandemic-sex/
>